Are Energy Drinks Heart Healthy? Your Support Needed!

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Over 50% of college students consume more than one energy drink per month. Energy drinks have also been related to increasing emergency room visits and deaths.

The research team, led by Sachin A. Shah, associate professor  pharmacy practice at University of the Pacific’s Thomas J. Long School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences have been performing energy drink related research for over 5 years. They are now looking to understand the effects of long term energy drink consumption on human health. They hope to raise $50,000 to conduct a clinical trial to continue their research on this important public health topic.

This project will also bolster student exposure to clinical research. In fact one such student was the recipient of the 2014 American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) Foundation’s Student Research Award.

You can help support student and faculty research efforts in improving human health by:

1) Donating to the crowdfunding campaign – http://go.pacific.edu/energydrinks

2) Sharing this information with others (email, social media, etc)

More information can be found at the following link: http://go.pacific.edu/energydrinks

They plan to present their results at a scientific conference and and have them published in a medical journal so that others may benefit from the discoveries you have funded.

Thank you for your consideration; we look forward to having your support.

Student Spotlight: Jennifer Elaine-Connsalvi Hodges ’16

jennifer_hodges_resizeIt was a bomb blast on the other side of the world that inspired Jennifer Elaine-Connsalvi Hodges ’16 to become a speech-language pathologist. Before coming to Pacific Hodges earned a bachelor of arts in child and adolescent development from San Francisco State University in 2008 and worked at the Ronald McDonald House. “While working at the Ronald McDonald House in San Francisco I met a 1 year old child from Baghdad who had become deaf due to a bomb exploding near his home,” said Hodges. “A non-profit called No More Victims flew him and his father to the United States and sponsored a cochlear implant for him.”

Hodges continues, “They stayed at the Ronald McDonald House for a year and a half. I witnessed the SLP working with him day in and day out after the implant. I’ve been blessed in my life to see a variety of beautiful things across the globe, but this experience far exceeds all else. Here was an innocent child of war who lost the ability to hear because of an American bomb drop. I was watching him sit in San Francisco with an American SLP who was completely volunteering her time to help in his rehabilitation. His mother and younger brother were stuck in Jordan for two years due to visa issues. I took the father and son to the airport to pick up their wife and mother two years later after the rehab and cochlear implant. I watched the reunification of a family that had fallen victim to the worst parts of humanity. He was able to speak and hear his mother. The tears just wouldn’t stop from all parties. That experience planted a seed that I just couldn’t shake; I wanted to help people take their God-given right to communicate.”

Hodges revealed her academic challenges when she started college at Rancho Santiago Community College, “I started from the beginning at the local junior college with really low math and English courses and retaught myself basic concepts. I struggled and changed my major a couple times, but I began to learn how I learn and the lights went on.” She found that the key to her academic success was understanding her personal learning style and creating a strategy for studying. She explains, “I needed silence to study, good lighting, repetition, visual, tactile and audio for information input. That took discipline, time, effort and sacrifice. Once I started seeing the results of my efforts I realized it wasn’t that I wasn’t smart, it was that I didn’t prioritize my learning nor did I understand how I learned.”

Being accepted to Pacific’s speech-language pathology (SLP) program was a decisive turning point. She shares, “Earning my way into University of the Pacific was one of the biggest and scariest accomplishments of my life. Little did I know it was just the medicine I needed. […] I felt like an equally contributing member of group work. I also had intriguing conversations with my incredible professors who always took the time to explain a topic or question me further to challenge my understanding. I came out of my Pacific coursework more confident than ever. Whatever obstacles come my way in the future I know not only will my creativity and social skills carry me, but I can also rely on my intellect that Pacific helped me realize.”

Hodges is the recipient of the Janet Nimtz Endowed Scholarship, which is awarded to an individual who plans to complete a medical internship. Pursuing her career goals required a significant financial investment. “This scholarship made a significant difference in my attitude about my debt,” said Hodges. Her plans after graduation are to pursue a career in rehabilitation. By making what she has invested in her education mentally easier to handle, it is easier for her to focus on working toward her goals of helping clients regain their communication skills.

Balancing life and the rigors of graduate school is challenging, but Hodges is undeterred and continues to pursue to her passions. In addition to working weekends at a restaurant in San Francisco, she is the president of a non-profit organization called Le Donne d’Italia. She founded Le Donne d’Italia in the North Beach district of San Francisco to promote and preserve Italian culture and Italian female heritage.

When asked if she would recommend SLP as a career Hodges exclaimed, “Do it!  Not only will you always have a job that makes you feel like you’re contributing to the world, but you’ll also never get bored. I have yet to find another career that is so versatile.”

 

Student Spotlight: Vien Vu ’17

vien-vuAn unquenchable thirst for understanding fitness led Vien Vu ’17, CSCS to pursue a doctor of physical therapy (DPT). He is a certified strength and conditioning specialist and a certified personal trainer. “So many times as a personal trainer I got frustrated. I didn’t know the answers to certain problems,” said Vu. He earned a bachelor of science in kinesiology from San Jose State University. What drew Vu to Pacific’s DPT program was the faculty and the resources available to students.

While working as a personal trainer he observed that professionals within the fitness industry discuss research findings, but there is a lack of quality, evidence-based information directed to the general public. He elaborates, “This is a passion of mine. There is so much stuff on the internet that is rubbish.” In response he launched a blog and podcast. His goal for How Fit Works is to help dispel misconceptions and misinformation about fitness by providing quality information and scholarly, peer-reviewed resources.

Vu’s philosophy is, “What’s not measured can’t be managed.” He shares, “I have an obsession with spreadsheets and numbers. I love data.” His zeal for collecting data has a practical purpose. He asks, “How can you measure change if you don’t have data?” Vu also emphasizes moderation and consistency. “Three times 52,” said Vu. “Who cares what you do in the gym? Show up three times a week, every week. Make it a routine like brushing your teeth.” He is committed to following his own advice. He makes it a priority to go to the gym even during finals week. “No matter how stressed I am I go, because I know I will drop the habit if I don’t continue and in terms of stress I will feel worse if I don’t go.” He emphasizes that it important to take care of yourself. “If you don’t take care of yourself you can’t take care of others.”

For Pacific’s students, faculty and staff who are interested in taking their physical fitness to the next level Vu recommends taking advantage of the resources at the Baun Fitness Center. The center has a group of nationally certified trainers and offers over 35 fitness classes. In addition, the Baun Fitness Center hosts free “Ask a Trainer” sessions on Mondays from 5-6 p.m. and Thursdays from 6-7 p.m. For more information contact Fitness Coordinator Caitlin Sommers at csommers@pacific.edu or 209.946.7300.

 

8 Things to Do During Your First Semester at Pacific

Jamie Legaspi ’18, Andy Szeto ’18, Michaela Vachuska ’18 and Milana Vachuska ’18 share their advice for getting the most out of your first semester at Pacific.

1) Get to you know your professors

Michaela Vachuska: “They are an incredibly helpful resource and will give you great advice if you find yourself struggling.”

Milana Vachuska: “The faculty here at Pacific are friendly, available and dedicated to the success of their students. This became apparent to me after my first tour of this campus. Not only are they super friendly and hilarious, but they can also help you through more difficult concepts. While it might seem intimidating at first, I promise it will be worth it.”

2) Get to know yourself

Milana Vachuska: “Get involved, attend speaker events and establish a routine that works for you. There is no ‘cookie-cutter’ approach […] you are going to have to adapt!”

3) Go to class

Szeto: “The first step in learning the material is to expose yourself to it. Repeated exposure helps cement concepts in your mind.”

Milana Vachuska: “I find that for every hour I spend being attentive in class, I save about three hours of toiling over the material. Don’t skip class, it’s a trap!”

4) Relax

Legaspi: “Find what makes helps you de-stress. Give yourself a time to relax and enjoy things you love to do.”

Szeto: “School, leadership and community service are important, so is taking time for yourself. Make sure you don’t burn yourself out and remind yourself that you deserve to unwind once in a while. The key to success is balance, everything in moderation.”

Michaela Vachuska: “My friends have ‘casual Fridays’ where we just hang out, socialize, eat and watch TV. It was always a great way to de-stress so I could be as productive as possible over the weekend!”

5) Stay positive

Michaela Vachuska: “It is important to celebrate your successes and learn from your failures. Don’t put too much pressure on yourself to be perfect!”

Milana Vachuska: “Being in the company of good friends helps me to keep a positive attitude during stressful or draining times.”

6) Join a student organization

Legaspi: “Don’t be afraid to take risks when it comes to joining clubs and organizations. On the other hand, only go for something if you have a passion for it, rather than doing it just to fluff up your resume.”

7) Use a calendar

Szeto: “With the plethora of organizations, committees and other extracurricular activities on top of academics, it is very easy to be overwhelmed. Put everything into an accessible planner to ensure you don’t miss any appointments and have ample time to prepare for projects or events.”

8) Dress professionally

Michaela Vachuska: “While it is not required, it could be helpful in making an impression while you are still new to campus!”

 

 

Student Spotlight: Benjamin Thompson ’18

slp-student-spotlight-benjamin-thompson2_resizeMusical festivals set Benjamin Thompson ’18 on the path to a career in audiology. “I began to wear earplugs at music festivals after a close friend recommended I consider protecting my hearing,” said Thompson. “Soon after I began personal research into the effects of noise on our auditory pathway. Audiology resonated with me because I enjoy working with people to improve their communication.”

For Thompson, music and audiology go hand-in-hand. He shares, “I would like to become more involved in hearing loss prevention campaigns for musicians and music lovers.” He adds, “Many of my friends are musicians, music lovers or work in the music industry and experience tinnitus. […] Hearing loss provides unique challenges to every individual.”

Thompson grew up in Newport, Rhode Island. He earned a bachelor of arts in communication and health from College of Charleston in Charleston, South Carolina. While living in Charleston he collaborated with local audiologists to conduct a research study about ear plug usage and concert attendance among college students.

Results of the study showed a lack of knowledge about noise-induced hearing loss and served as his motivation to design a community education event. “Of respondents, 70 percent have experienced tinnitus after attending a concert and 90 percent have never used ear plugs,” Thompson explains. “Short-term tinnitus, ringing in the ears, may be a precursor to hearing loss. With the results, I organized a hybrid education and entertainment event called ‘Decibel: Hearing Conservation Seminar’ with a presentation by a local audiologist.”

Pacific’s doctor of audiology (AuD) program brought Thompson to California. “I chose to be a part of Pacific’s inaugural class because of the need for audiologists in California,” shares Thompson. “Pacific’s AuD program in the second year consists of classes three days a week and clinical experience two days a week. I enjoy this balance of theory and practice because it allows students to exercise our knowledge immediately. Our program introduces students to Pacific’s Hearing and Balance Center in downtown San Francisco from the beginning of the program. We are one of the select accelerated AuD programs in the country. The fast-paced nature of the program is challenging. It requires sharp mental focus and diligence.”

Thompson loves being outdoors either camping, hiking or surfing. His ideal weekend would be exploring California’s untamed coastline, either in Big Sur or the Lost Coast. He  found a way to combine his love for outdoor adventures with his passion for audiology. “This August I organized a fundraiser titled, ‘Hiking for Hearing: California to Guatemala.’ I hiked the 210-mile John Muir Trail from Yosemite Valley to Mount Whitney. The trip raised money for an audiology mission trip to Guatemala this fall that two Pacific classmates and I plan to attend.”

Thompson encourages those who are interested in pursuing a career in audiology to learn more about the different specialties within the profession. He adds, “Pacific’s AuD program accepts students from a diverse background of undergraduate studies.” To learn more about Pacific’s audiology program go to pacific.edu/aud

 

Student Spotlight: Michael Dessel ’15, DPT

michael_dessel_nyc_resizedFor Michael Dessel ’15, DPT his physical therapy (PT) experiences have been a study in contrasts. In 2014 he accompanied Casey Nesbit, PT, DPT, DSc, PCS Director of Clinical Education and Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy, Meiying Lam ’15, DPT and Katherine Samstag ’15, DPT on a service-learning trip to Malawi. For his final clinical rotation, he went to New York City where he interned at Professional Physical Therapy, located between 5th Avenue and Madison Avenue. Despite the juxtaposition of these two settings, the level of care he provided to his patients was the same. Dr. Nesbit can attest to his commitment to provide all patients with optimal care.

Dessel’s patient-centered philosophy came from both his experiences at Pacific and his own set of personal values. “We learned that you need to treat your patients with respect,” said Dessel. He saw this exemplified in the actions of the Pacific faculty and his fellow students. Dessel shares that in addition to respect, his core values are integrity, compassion, accountability and empathy. He believes that as a physical therapist it is important to convey to your patients that you have their best interest at heart. Dessel adds, “The key to understanding your patients is listening to what they have to say. Develop a rapport with your patients.” He finds that when meeting with a new patient it is important to take the time to understand why they are coming to see you. “We didn’t choose the patients, the patients chose us for a reason.”

Dessel working with a patient during his trip to Malawi.
Dessel working with a patient during his trip to Malawi.

Dessel speaks from experience when he says that as a PT student at Pacific you are exposed to “a variety of patient populations in regards to pathology, clinical settings and patients with different socio-cultural backgrounds.” Through local outreach programs students have the opportunity to interact with members of the community. Dessel took advantage of experiential learning opportunities and has been a part of several outreach programs. He emphasizes the importance of gaining hands-on experience while you are still a student: “Of course you need the theoretical and practical background, but working with real people is vital to learning and developing yourself into a proficient clinician.” He adds, “You learn how to become comfortable with treating people.”

When asked if he would recommend the experiential service learning elective he answered, “Absolutely! I loved that elective. Getting that experience, going global with healthcare provided perspective. It sure provided perspective for me. I think that is something that everyone should take advantage of.”

Dessel was offered a Physical Therapist position at Professional Physical Therapy upon completion of his internship and he is currently living in New York. As he embarks on his career he shares that he is grateful for the set of experiences that led him to the place he is now. He reflects, “I like to travel, I like to work in different settings and I’ve been fortunate enough to do that.” For Dessel learning doesn’t stop once a degree has been earned. “I want to continue to learn and be mentored to by the senior PTs,” shares Dessel. “I want to be the best physical therapist I can be.”

 

 

Introducing Pacific’s Chapter of the Student Academy of Audiology

SAA-groupFrom the beginning the School’s faculty and students set a precedent for establishing chapters of professional organizations soon after programs were launched. The doctor of audiology (AuD) program continued in this tradition when Pacific’s chapter of the Student Academy of Audiology (SAA) was formed in November 2015, only a few months after the program launched. “The Student Academy of Audiology brings together students who have a passion for audiology,” said Veronica Koo ’18. “The goals of SAA are to provide a means for students to become more involved in the profession, encourage them to advocate for the rights of audiologists, promote leadership and mentorship and provide networking opportunities between students and professionals.”

The SAA is the national student division of the American Academy of Audiology (the Academy), which is the largest professional organization in the field of audiology. In essence, the SAA is a nationwide network of students. “SAA provides a place for students to interact and bond over their passion for audiology,” shares Koo. “In class students learn about best practices as audiologists and all the technical information we need to know to be the most effective and skilled audiologists that we can be. Through SAA, we are connected to fellow students across the nation who have the same enthusiasm for audiology. We learn about what other students are doing to help the growth of our profession and it encourages us to find our own way to give back to our field and the communities we serve.”

Sharing Pacific’s core value of community involvement the Academy advocates for SAA chapters to organize and participate in community outreach programs. “Local SAA chapters are encouraged to provide audiology services to their communities, which also brings greater awareness of the profession and the importance of our hearing,” said Koo. She emphasizes the importance of AuD students engaging with the community. She explains, “Many people are unaware of the profession of audiology and in turn are unaware of the importance of preserving one’s hearing.”

Outreach programs are beneficial to both the community and to students. Koo shares, “After learning how to diagnose and treat patients in the classroom, we truly learn how our knowledge can provide specific care when going out into the community and learning about the needs of those who would benefit from our services. Educating the community helps students solidify the knowledge obtained in class and develops empathetic audiologists who are more intimately aware of the population that they will serve in the near future.”

Pacific’s chapter of SAA has partnered with Entheos Audiology Cooperative . Entheos is a member-owned cooperative that believes it is a privilege to have the opportunity to provide hearing healthcare services. Their mission is to share their time and talent in parts of the world where audiology services are not readily available. According to Koo, “We are currently working towards sending students to locations such as Guatemala, Jordan, Mozambique, Zambia, Haiti and more. Students will be fitting donated hearing aids on children and adults who are unable to afford these devices and do not have access to audiology services in their country.”

To learn more about the SAA go to saa.audiology.org.

 

 

Pacific’s Phi Delta Chi Wins Highest Honor

At the 70th Grand Council August 4-9, 2015, in Albuquerque, New Mexico, the Alpha Psi Chapter of Phi Delta Chi received the Emory W. Thurston Grand President’s Award. Logan Brodnansky ’17, President of Phi Delta Chi, Alpha Psi Chapter, explains that being the recipient of the Thurston Cup is “the highest honor our fraternity can receive.” The award was established in 1974 through a generous donation by Emory W. Thurston. It is given to the chapter that “promoted the profession of pharmacy and Phi Delta Chi fully during the preceding year,” according to the Phi Delta Chi 2015 Pledge Manual. “To qualify, a Chapter must receive a 90% or higher rating in the Achievement Award Program.” The scores are determined by six weighted categories: Professional & Service Projects Report (one per semester), Chapter Publication, Prescott Scholarship Report, Brotherhood Report and Professional Window Display.deans_letter_fall15_phi_delta_chi_trophy_web

According to Marcus C Ravnan ’94, PharmD, FCSHP, FASHP, who serves as the chapter’s Faculty Advisor, “In addition, the Chapter ranked in the top ten for the Ralph L. Saroyan Brotherhood Award which recognized chapter programs that promote brotherhood within the chapter. The last time Alpha Psi received this coveted honor was in 1980 in Washington DC with Ivan Cy Rowland in attendance. The Pacific chapter has ranked in the top ten for the past 15 or more years and has been in fourth place the past two years.” Over the years there has been increased competition for these coveted awards. Ravnan confirms, “What’s even more significant is that in 1980, there were only 50 chapters of Phi Delta Chi and now there are 85 active chapters competing for this award.” To be recognized for this award is especially meaningful as the award is named in honor of Ralph L. Saroyan ’64, RPh, a key figure in the School’s history, who is currently an emeritus professor and esteemed mentor.

Established in 1883 the coed pharmacy fraternity is the country’s first professional pharmacy fraternity. According to the Phi Delta Chi’s website, www.phideltachi.org, Phi Delta Chi is one of the largest pharmacy fraternities in the country with over 60,000 initiated Brothers and “nearly one in every twelve pharmacists is a Phi Delta Chi Brother.” Pacific’s Alpha Psi stood out among the other 85 collegiate chapters at this year’s Grand Council, the fraternity’s biannual leadership conference. In addition to the recognition of the highest award, they placed for the following individual awards: First place in Professional Service Projects for their professional and community service, second place for Prescott Scholarship Award for academic achievement, third place for Chapter Publication Award and fourth place for the Leadership Award. Receiving these awards is a testament to the ability of Pacific’s pharmacy students to strike a balance between the aspects of professional and social life in the midst of rigorous academic study.

 

Alumni Spotlight: Chris Wolfinger ’15 Lands Head Athletic Trainer Position

deans_letter_chris_wolfing_hockey_webChris Wolfinger ’15 has come a long way from when he first played ice hockey at the age of five. He now holds the position of Head Athletic Trainer at the San Jose Barracuda Hockey Club, an AHL affiliate of the San Jose Sharks. For Wolfinger this is a dream come true. He explains, “It’s been a dream of mine to work in professional ice hockey. Now that I’m in the field, it’s been exciting having the opportunity to apply the skills and knowledge I’ve obtained to helping these professional athletes participate at their highest potential physically and mentally.” His interest in hockey has influenced his choices academically and now professionally. “Growing up playing ice hockey really molded my career aspirations. I knew I wanted to work in the medical field and knew that the athletic training/physical therapy route would be a good way to get there.”

Wolfinger knows from experience the value of internships and how they can lead to career opportunities. Describing his experience he said, “I would go in and shadow the San Jose Sharks medical staff whenever I had the opportunity. Each time I went in I would offer to help in any capacity. I demonstrated confidence in my skills and developed a good rapport with both the staff and players. These small opportunities eventually led to the opportunity to apply and eventually interview for the position I currently hold.”

Wolfinger was able to transfer many of the skill acquired during his time at Pacific into his role working with the players of the San Jose Barracudas. He explains, “I was able to develop high level manual therapy skills, as well as examination and evaluation of musculoskeletal injuries during my time at Pacific. The trend of professional sports seems to be going towards hiring a team PT. Having the DPT degree provided me with a high level of critical thinking skills as well as injury pattern recognition and quality treatment strategies.”

His advice for students pursuing internship opportunities is to “Be the hardest worker in the room, in whatever setting you go into.” To make the most of an internship, networking is key. When networking he recommends acting with professionalism in all interactions. He said, “Be professional when sending emails [and making] phone calls to potential employers.” He adds, “It doesn’t hurt to send a resume in your introduction email, that way the employer can start to get a feel for you who are.”

He again emphasized the importance of hard work and dedication. “It’s all about putting in the time and hard work, whether that’s in the world of academia or the professional world. Be confident with the skills and experience you obtained while in school.” Reflecting on his experiences, he expressed that he would “absolutely” facilitate an internship if he had the capacity to do so and he strongly encourages his fellow alumni to do so as well.

To learn about how your business or organization could host an internship please contact Casey Nesbit, PT, DPT, DSc, PCS, Director of Clinical Education, at 209.946.2399 or cnesbit@pacific.edu. To hear about upcoming networking events follow us at www.facebook.com/PacificPaHSAlumni.

 

Student Spotlight: Anna Barrett ’16

Anna Barrett ‘16, student physical therapist, received the Team Osan Spouses’ Club Continuing Education Scholarship. The $2,250 scholarship recognizes military personnel or their dependents for their leadership, honors and community service. Barrett met her husband, Matthew, while studying exercise biology at University of California in Davis. “He loves to remind me of the fact that I introduced myself to him first,” she said. Matthew is an officer in the U.S. Air Force and is an A-10 pilot.Anna Barrett_resized

“I feel extremely honored to receive this scholarship amongst the many deserving students who have family members stationed in South Korea.  I truly appreciate the commitment of Team Osan Spouses’ Club to the academic and professional advancement of military spouses,” said Barrett.

The scholarship will support Barrett as she pursues a doctor of physical therapist degree at Pacific. She said she chose Pacific for its powerful alumni network and resources in the community. Among her professional career goals, Barrett hopes to bring individualized and empathetic care to veterans especially those who require prosthetics. “I want to be part of something bigger than myself and am I am so excited to have the opportunity to restore movement to those with limitations.”

Barrett will spend the first two years of her marriage apart from her husband. “It has been hard but I am so blessed to have a husband who supports my professional goals.” When asked about her thoughts on being a military spouse Barrett said, “What I love most about being a military spouse is the support, kindness, and camaraderie of the military community.

Barrett grew up in Chico with her parents and older sister. When she was 18, she spent a summer in Dubai teaching English. During her childhood, she was a two-time artistic roller skating national champion and still enjoys roller-skating in her spare time. She also credits her parents, both of whom are teachers, for encouraging her love of learning and helping her to become the person she is today.

 

 

Student Spotlight: April Nguyen ’16

April NguyenApril Nguyen ‘16 means business when it comes to her role as the 2014-2015 vice president of legislative affairs. Originally drawn to the Thomas J. Long School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences for its accelerated program, Nguyen spent time considering other options but found the School to have the most efficient and challenging pharmacy program in California, as well as a focus on leadership, outreach and networking.

In her leadership capacity, she served as a state liaison representing the pharmacy student body and local pharmacist associations. During the first legislative week at University of the Pacific, Nguyen organized eight events, which promoted the potential impact student pharmacists can make on legislation. Her leadership in organizing the annual “Immunize the Mayor” event resulted in a City of Stockton proclamation that officially named October as American Pharmacists Month. Through her role, she also was able to collaborate with state and national associations to give pharmacy students and professionals a voice in the United States Congress.

“As student [pharmacists], we have the power to impact the patients we serve on a larger level, but students often feel too intimidated by the political implications to consider themselves an advocate. I wanted to take on this role to disseminate information to advance advocacy efforts and increase opportunities for students to become actively involved in the profession,” said Nguyen.

Nguyen is deeply involved in the community and strives to use her Vietnamese and English interpreting skills to benefit underserved populations. In the fall, she organized the American Pharmacist’s Association-Academy of Student Pharmacist’s (APhA-ASP) first health fair at the Midtown Farmers Market in Sacramento – which resulted in collaborations between several pharmacy schools. The event provided patient consultations to 400 community members in Hmong, Spanish, and Vietnamese.

In addition, she is currently on the books and electronic products editorial advisory board at the American Pharmacists Association. She provides the board with a student’s perspective when considering curriculum revisions and works in collaboration with the board at its annual meeting. The group analyzes and recommends new books and e-products that may be helpful to pharmacy students, professionals and technicians. In March, Nguyen was one of the first three students to be recognized nationally as an APhA-ASP trained advocate. The training series recognizes student pharmacists who have advocated extensively for the profession and inspired other students to become advocates.

After graduation, her goal is to work with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. She hopes to advance the pharmacy profession through regulatory and legislative affairs. Nguyen is passionate about educating the American public on drug safety and regulation as well as the role of pharmacists in health care.

“I hope to establish a tradition of collaboration and advocacy through initiatives such as legislative week or the APhA-ASP Health Fair at [the] Midtown Farmers Market to increase awareness of the services that pharmacists can provide to the community,” said Nguyen.

In her free time Nguyen enjoys traveling to exciting locales where she samples food and collects postcards. She also relishes spending time with her family and singing duets with her sister. Since her grandparents instilled a strong sense of her heritage, she is grateful to have the opportunity to practice her patient counseling skills in Vietnamese. Nguyen’s enduring role models have also been her parents who she sees as examples for success in life.