Stephen Chan ’11: Balance is the Key

If you’re ever looking for Stephen Chan ’11, you’ll more than likely find him outdoors playing sports or bicycling. His love for sports and the Department of Physical Therapy’s accelerated program, good reputation, and the beauty of the University’s campus is what brought him to Pacific.

Chan received his Bachelor of Science degree in Exercise Biology from the University of California, Davis and is a member of the Doctor of Physical Therapy Class of 2011. He became interested in physical therapy as an intern at the UC Davis Medical Center working alongside physical therapists. He chose physical therapy because he wanted to promote health and provide services that will help change people’s lives.

As he completes his final exams and prepares for clinical internships, he recalls his most memorable moments were those shared with his classmates and taking courses with Dr. Jim Mansoor, PhD, Professor in the Department of Physical Therapy. “I enjoyed working in groups because it was fun. Four-hour lab sessions never felt too long,” says Chan.

He also shared some advice on how to become a successful student physical therapist. “It’s important to practice good time management and study habits because it’s important to find a good balance,” says Chan.

Chan was born and raised in San Jose, CA and is the youngest of two sons. He will be doing his clinical internships in Los Angeles, Seattle, and San Diego.

Dr. Michael Susca: Challenging but Fair

When student speech-language pathologists hear the name Dr. Michael Susca, PhD, CCC-SLP, BRS-FD, their first thoughts are of how his courses are not only challenging but rewarding. “Students usually say I’m hard but fair,” says Dr. Susca, who believes in enabling students to step outside their comfort zones for learning.

Dr. Susca is an Associate Professor in the Department of Speech-Language Pathology and has been at Pacific since 2001. He earned his Bachelor of Science degree at the University of Santa Barbara, Master of Science degree at the University of New Mexico, and his Doctor of Philosophy degree at the University of Nebraska. He is also one of approximately 200 Board Recognized Specialists in Fluency Disorders in the United States.

At a young age, Dr. Susca battled with stuttering and received speech therapy form third grade until his undergraduate years at University of Santa Barbara. It was his relationship with his speech-language pathologist that inspired him to study communication disorders. Today, Dr. Susca, who now speaks fluently, provides various clinical services for people who stutter.

Pumpkin dedicated to his years as a member on the Pacific Rowing Team

Dr. Susca praises the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, ASHA, for their efforts in educating the communities, local schools for identifying the need for speech therapy, speech-language pathologists in private practice for their distinguished work, and the media for presenting communication disorders in a positive light.

In the Oscar and Grammy award-winning film “The King’s Speech,” an Australian man named Lionel Logue works closely with King George VI to manage the king’s stuttering during radio speeches given in World War II. The movie depicts many of the complexities associated with stuttering.

“Stuttering has often been associated with people of low intelligence.  One reason the King’s Speech was a great film is that an individual with a stutter was also depicted as an intelligent man, a king,” commented Dr. Susca.  Today ASHA represents more than 145, 000 professionals who treat communication disorders.

His advice for students who are preparing for graduate school and for the profession is that they “think outside the box, challenge not only the authority but their own thinking, assume little, and continue learning.” Dr. Susca states a belief that his personal therapist and Logue were successful because of these reasons and because they had deep “knowledge, pushed the edge of the envelope, were creative, and developed a relationship with their patients.”

Dr. Susca is a humble man with a deep passion for his profession, patients, and students. Although he refrained from boasting his impressive list of accomplishments, he did share a few. In 2007, Dr. Susca was the director of the thesis The Effect of Phonological and Semantic Cues on Word Retrieval in Adults given by Katheryn Elizabeth Burrill, BS. At that time, it was the first thesis that had been defended in 23 years in his department at Pacific.

Pumpkin dedicated to his years as a member on the Pacific Rowing Team

Dr. Susca is an organic gardener and enjoys carving pumpkins for leisure and competitively known as “Mike the Knife,” sailing, poetry, and the thrill of skydiving which includes a total of 128 jumps. He lives in Stockton with his wife Mary Alice and his sons Galen and Ethan. Ethan is currently a junior at Harvey Mudd College.

 

VN CARES Pacific Family Health Fair Going Strong

The Fourth Annual Vietnamese Cancer Awareness Research Education Society, VN CARES, Pacific Family Health Fair hosted approximately 500 community members on March 6, 2011 at St. Luke’s Catholic Church in Stockton. The event was organized by Pacific’s VN CARES students with help from nearly 150 Pacific student pharmacists, 20 Pacific and UC Davis students, 12 community pharmacists, and 20 community exhibitors. Many of the preceptors were Pacific alumni, donating their time and expertise to mentoring the next generation of Pacific pharmacists.The purpose of VN CARES is to promote health issue awareness, knowledge, and preventative care in the Vietnamese community, in addition to creating opportunities for students interested in the health field to gain experience and work in the community.

The Fourth Annual Vietnamese Cancer Awareness Research Education Society, VN CARES, Pacific Family Health Fair hosted approximately 500 community members on March 6, 2011 at St. Luke’s Catholic Church in Stockton. The event was organized by Pacific’s VN CARES students with help from nearly 150 Pacific student pharmacists, 20 Pacific and UC Davis students, 12 community pharmacists, and 20 community exhibitors. Many of the preceptors were Pacific alumni, donating their time and expertise to mentoring the next generation of Pacific pharmacists.The purpose of VN CARES is to promote health issue awareness, knowledge, and preventative care in the Vietnamese community, in addition to creating opportunities for students interested in the health field to gain experience and work in the community.

Taya Malone ’12: Leading By Example

Taya Malone ’12 is a leader among her peers, representing the Pharmacy Class of 2012 as the American Pharmacists Association (APhA), Academy of Student Pharmacists (ASP), President.

She graduated from DePauw University of Greencastle, Indiana, in 2005 with a Bachelor of Arts in Biology and later attended University of St. Thomas in Houston, Texas earning her Secondary Teacher Certification. After teaching for two years at Alexander Hamilton Middle School, she moved to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to attend Drexel University College of Medicine where she did her post baccalaureate studies. During her time at Drexel she worked as a Student Researcher in the School’s Angiogenesis Research Laboratory and as a Project Associate for the Center for Obesity Research and Education.

Malone discovered her interest in Pharmacy while teaching in Houston. When she noticed that student attendance was low, often times due to illnesses because most of the students lived together, she invited a local pharmacist to speak about preventive care, infections, bed bugs, and more. She was also able to further her pre-pharmacy course work at Drexel. Although the program focused on students with an interest in medical school, she was able to work with the administrators in finding new ways to incorporate pharmacy.

At Pacific, Malone is a dedicated Student Ambassador to the Pacific Pharmacy Alumni Association and when she is not busy being ASP President, she is working at Target as an Executive Intern. Her responsibilities there included taking initiative in handling guest service issues related to prescription filling, data entry and drug utilization exception overrides, and developing, executing and evaluating projects that will positively and profitably impact the pharmacy, store and community. Recently, she hosted the Target Scholarship Competition where four student pharmacists each won a $4,000 scholarship.

Some of Malone’s greatest memories at Pacific are running for ASP President, being able to collaborate with student pharmacists on events and promoting American Pharmacist Month. Through ASP, student pharmacists participated in two episodes of the gameshow The Price is Right. After recording the episodes they organized an advertisement that reached nearly 4.5 million people on the Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) resulting in another successful “AARP Meet the Pharmacist Day,” a national event.

“Through my leadership role as ASP President I was able to grow professionally and personally. I’ve been able to develop relationships through networking. I believe it will prepare me well to be a health care provider,” said Malone.

Malone will be doing her Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience rotation in Bakersfield this fall. She is interested in the pharmaceutical research and infectious diseases.

She is a committed member of Kappa Psi and plays on the Kappa Psi intramural basketball and football teams. Malone’s love for travel has taken her from her roots in Washington, DC to California but one thing is for sure, she will continue to grow and be successful wherever she goes.

 

Sandra Bellamy: Profile of a Valuable Pacifican

Sandra Bellamy ’97 ’99 ’03 is Associate Professor in the Department of Physical Therapy. She is a Pediatric Certified Specialist and teaches courses in pediatric physical therapy, movement analysis, prosthetics and orthotics, and applied clinical problem solving. She earned both her undergraduate and graduate degrees from University of the Pacific.

After completing her masters degree, she became a clinician and dedicated herself to serving pediatric patients and their families in the Stockton area for many years. She returned to Pacific as a part-time instructor in 2001, completed her doctorate in 2003, and became full-time faculty member in 2004.

“The shortage of pediatric practitioners in the profession was my first motivation to explore teaching. As a clinician, I improved the health and function of children, one at a time. I learned that through teaching I could impact a greater number of patients by preparing each graduate of our program to serve those at the early stages of the lifespan,” said Dr. Bellamy.

Through her years at Pacific, Dr. Bellamy has witnessed the evolution of the University, the School, and the Department. She describes the graduation of Pacific’s first doctorally-prepared class, the groundbreaking and opening ceremony of the Chan Family Health Sciences Learning Center and Clinics, and the inaugural Physical Therapy White Coat Ceremony in August, 2010 as most memorable.

Dr. Bellamy is responsible for the coordination of the Pacific Physical Therapy Training Clinic. In this role, she supervises physical therapy students in the delivery of services provided free to uninsured and underinsured community individuals of all ages.

“Every year we have patients who say the students’ work gives them purpose and direction for growth and to fight to keep what they have. I’m proud to see the positive impact our students’ contributions have made in the lives of so many community members,” commented Dr. Bellamy.

Dr. Bellamy was born in Stockton to a military family and is herself a U.S. Navy veteran, serving for six years as an electronics technician. Having lived in Hawai’i as a child, she rediscovered her love for the people and culture of the Pacific Islands. She has studied and performed Polynesian dance as a student in a Stockton halau (school) for the past 11 years. She lives in Lodi, near her two grown children and three grandchildren.

Dr. Bellamy takes pleasure in the Central Valley’s agriculture, weather, and cultural diversity. She particularly enjoys cherries and asparagus, the summer’s hot days and evening Delta Breeze, and local live music and art. She loves to spend her free time outdoors if possible and can’t decide if she likes California’s coastline or Sierras best. Her hobbies include horseback riding, camping and running. She chose Stockton’s first half-marathon in November, 2010 as her first try at long-distance running and is preparing for a marathon in Fall, 2011.